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When it comes to user data, are we done catching Google red-handed?
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When it comes to user data, are we done catching Google red-handed?
“A dormant, stationary Android phone…communicated location information to Google 340 times during a 24-hour period, or at an average of 14 data communications per hour.”
By Christine Schmidt
Line is another chat app rife with spam, scams, and bad information. The volunteer-supported Cofacts is fact-checking them in the open
Users forward dubious messages to a chatbot; volunteer editors evaluate their credibility; the bot answers back to the user (and anyone wondering in the future).
By Kirsten Han
Alphabet soup: Will the merger of PRX and PRI shift the competitive landscape of public radio (and podcasting)?
Plus: A wave of new releases for the fall, an up-and-down week for My Favorite Murder, and SB Nation goes big on local sports podcasts.
By Nicholas Quah
Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?
Plus: “Most of the people reviewing Burmese content spoke English.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How The Globe and Mail is covering cannabis, Canada’s newest soon-to-be-legal industry
Just for starters, the Globe will have an expanding hub of coverage online, more live events, and a high-priced premium subscription newsletter for industry professionals.
By Shan Wang
Has the GDPR law actually gotten European news outlets to cut down on rampant third-party cookies and content on their sites? It seems so
Some third-party cookies were still present, of course. But there was a decrease in third-party content loaded from social media platforms and from content recommendation widgets.
By Shan Wang
Democracy is cracking and platforms are no help. What can we do about it? Some policy suggestions
Here are a few in a new Canadian report: greater transparency requirements for digital news publishers, holding social media companies legally liable for the content on their platforms, and mandatory independent audits for platform algorithms.
By Christine Schmidt
How media coverage of epidemics helps raise anxiety and reduce trust
“Telling people about scary diseases without informing them about ways to protect themselves is a good way to cause anxiety and emotional distress — and a bad way to build trust in government health agencies.”
By Yotam Ophir
Major internet companies might want to push their own point of view, but can they also take care of misinformation please and thank you
Three-quarters of Americans surveyed say social networks should show the same set of news topics to all users, ignoring their stated interests or browsing history. (Someone should tell them about newspapers!)
By Christine Schmidt
I want bad news and I want it fast: That’s the business model for Factal, a business-focused company from the founders of Breaking News
A consumer product is on the roadmap, but for now, Factal is aimed at businesses and will cost several thousand dollars a month.
By Laura Hazard Owen
American podcasters are starting to pay more attention to their international audiences (and their pounds, loonies, and euros)
Plus: Slow Burn returns for Season 2, the new class of podcast apps plays around with paid models, and figuring out podcasting’s Audible future.
By Nicholas Quah
How not to be a parachute partner: ProPublica’s figured out how to collaborate with local newsrooms without bigfooting them
“We’re really proud of our work at the Southern Illinoisan, but we have a flashlight, not a lighthouse.”
By Christine Schmidt
When it comes to user data, are we done catching Google red-handed?
“A dormant, stationary Android phone…communicated location information to Google 340 times during a 24-hour period, or at an average of 14 data communications per hour.”
By Christine Schmidt
Line is another chat app rife with spam, scams, and bad information. The volunteer-supported Cofacts is fact-checking them in the open
Users forward dubious messages to a chatbot; volunteer editors evaluate their credibility; the bot answers back to the user (and anyone wondering in the future).
Alphabet soup: Will the merger of PRX and PRI shift the competitive landscape of public radio (and podcasting)?
Plus: A wave of new releases for the fall, an up-and-down week for My Favorite Murder, and SB Nation goes big on local sports podcasts.
What We’re Reading
The Verge / Russell Brandom
Google is developing an experimental podcast app called Shortwave
“Called Shortwave, the new app was revealed by a trademark filing…which describes it as ‘allow[ing] users to search, access, and play digital audio files, and to share links to audio files.'”
News and Observer / Luke DeCock
He had an opportunity to join The Athletic, but he’s staying at The News & Observer
“I wish The Athletic the best. More jobs for people in my line of work is a good thing, and a little healthy competition is as well. They have hired some of my really good friends, longtime and valued colleagues and people I don’t know but whose work I deeply respect. But they can’t do what we do: Cover a community from top to bottom with the kind of depth and analysis you can’t get from two minutes on TV and the expertise your neighbor posting on Nextdoor doesn’t have.”
BuzzFeed News / Alex Kantrowitz
Facebook advertisers will no longer be able to hide their ads from people interested in “Islamic culture,” “Passover,” and more
“Facebook is planning to remove more than 5,000 ad targeting options in an effort to prevent discriminatory advertising. The bulk of the 5,000 targeting options, slated for removal by this fall, could be used as proxies by advertisers looking to identify and exclude ethnic and religious groups.”
Washington Post / Elizabeth Dwoskin
Facebook is rating the trustworthiness of its users on a scale from zero to one
“The score is one measurement among thousands of new behavioral clues that Facebook now takes into account as it seeks to understand risk. Facebook is also monitoring which users have a propensity to flag content published by others as problematic and which publishers are considered trustworthy by users. It is unclear what other criteria Facebook measures to determine a user’s score, whether all users have a score and in what ways the scores are used.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
Fake news 2.0: The propaganda war gets sophisticated
“Now that platforms are prioritizing the removal of millions of fake accounts, bad actors are looking to hijack real accounts to avoid detection.”
World Magazine / Charissa Crotts, Elizabeth Rieth, Isaiah Johnson
How Liberty University is censoring its student newspaper
As an administrator told the journalists: “Your job is to keep the LU reputation and the image as it is. … Don’t destroy the image of LU. Pretty simple. OK? Well you might say, ‘Well, that’s not my job, my job is to do journalism. My job is to be First Amendment. My job is to go out and dig and investigate, and I should do anything I want to do because I’m a journalist.’ So let’s get that notion out of your head. OK?”
The Intercept / Sam Biddle
Facebook suspended a leftist Latin American news network Telesur and gave three different reasons why
“A Facebook customer support agent told the network that the suspension appeared to be due to a technical glitch. The next day, Facebook wrote Telesur again, this time saying that the company’s engineers had conducted ‘several tests’ and assured the outlet that ‘technicians’ continued to look for an answer. On Wednesday, after a 48-hour blackout, Facebook wrote once more to say the page had been suspended due to a mysterious ‘instability on the platform,’ which had now been corrected.”
The Idea / Atlantic Media / Mollie Leavitt
A Q&A with Elisabeth Goodridge, editorial director of newsletters at the New York Times
“If we make sure that we provide stellar products that people will actually want to open, again, that inbox is a very intimate space, it’s also a very crowded space, so we need to give them, and habituate them to something that they value, so that they open it up day in and day out. So that’s the number one goal, for us, is optimizing these newsletters so we can make them amazing, and number two, launch newsletters people will open. It’s considering not only writing a great subject line, all the way down to understanding what’s the footer experience.”
The Verge / Nick Statt
A fake Twitter ad campaign encourages users to be more skeptical on social media
Don’t Believe Every Tweet made the rounds early this morning, fooling tech critics and reporters into thinking Twitter had launched a marketing effort centered on its own inability to police fake and misleading information. The project includes a Twitter account, a YouTube video featuring comedian Greg Barris, and a website, complete with fake quotes from Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey.”
Poynter / Ren LaForme
How one journalist built a free resource that has already coached hundreds of women in journalism
Digitalwomenleaders.com, created by Katie Hawkins-Gaar, is a platform that facilitates a free 30-minute coaching session with any mentor who’s available. It’s first come, first serve and free to any woman working in journalism. All the coaches are doing this on a volunteer basis. I built and am updating the site on a pro bono basis so it’s just like a big gift to the journalism community.”
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